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Here is an example of a Horse Boy Method activity prepared for Scub.

Scub beloved Horse Betsy passed away two years ago. Since then he hasn’t really ridden other horses and we wanted to plan a fun way to reintroduce new horses to Scub.

A family was coming for a playdate sessions and Scub’s mentor Laurence was asked to fetch Ma ( one of our main playdate horses) and Scub tagged along. He was quite proud of himself and happily brought Majana over to the playdate and handed him over for the family to use.

We decided to use Majana as he had such a good experience with her the time before.

We created a silly and humorous story around the activity of Lunging a horse.  Rupert and Scub have an inside joke about “wobbler obbler” bellies, which inspired the “script” for the activity. Let’s help Majana feel sexy again and loose some of her wobbler obbler belly she had gained over the summer.

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In this activity we were able to incorporate mathematical components as we had to measure her belly and then plug in the numerical date we collected into the formula for calculating a Horse’s body weight.We explained that lunging a horse is when you stand at the center/ radius of a 20m circle while asking the horse to move forward and do transitions from trot to canter and vice versa.

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Week 1:

We did not put pressure during the initial session for him to adhere to the rules of “classical Lunging”.

We simply wanted to drop the idea of lunging a horse and then do a bit of the actual lunging.

Therefore we did not pressure him to stand in one spot (he was allowed to walk and move around a bit ) and while he held the lunge line, someone else operated the whip to help him.

He learned the verbal commands “Trot trot” to ask the horse to trot increase speed at the trot, and raise his pitch to ask the horse to “canter” and then lower his voice and say “Teee-Rottt” to get him to transition back to the trot.

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