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Turning a no situation into a yes.

G. was without paraprofessional support this day.

Interestingly enough I got a note saying: ‘There is a huge folder with worksheets, he will be fine’. Red flags all over!!!

This is not going to make him feel 'fine' throughout the day and once he is triggered, there will be no support and we will have an issue that will affect the entire class.

To be successful, we build in a lot of movement. When I noticed him getting triggered, I took the entire class out for math warm ups and reviews in a playful way.

Eventually he did have to do some of the worksheets, but we used a timer for work and play. When the timer was done he could get up and play with kinetic sand until the timer was done he would go back and work.

It empowered him to be independent and have a balanced approach for his needs. Eventually he started stacking markers together instead of playing with sand.

That was a No since it made a giant mess of our marker buckets, but instead of saying 'no' and causing him to be triggered, MM trains us to turn it into a YES situation.

I allowed him to use stacking blocks to decorate my door frame during his break times. He loved that and got the entire class supporting his artwork- really neat interaction between him and his classmates that came out of it.

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