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young horse - What do I do?

8 years 1 month ago #30 by ntls team
young horse - What do I do? was created by ntls team
Hi
We met you at the Reliant Center where you were giving a demonstration and per our conversation, you offered to send us a dvd on “really basics” and a list of local resources that we might utilize in our efforts to train this particular horse while we are searching for a more suitable horse for our original efforts. I agree with you in that this horse is too young, and too “wild” (for a better word) for the original intent and can not be used for this purpose. However, she appears to have potential for other uses and I would like to see if she is workable as a future trail/riding horse. I have no illusions that this animal is even remotely trustworthy, and realize that this will take a lot of time.
We would appreciate any assistance that you might be able to offer.

Presently the horse will:
· Take a bit with no issues and can be led around by the reins or just using a simple halter.

· Is docile/curious around people

· Will walk with handler with no problems

· Will lift legs for hoof cleaning

· Accepted first time farrier service for cleaning, filing, etc. including placing hoofs on stand.

· However, is very skiddish and will try to run on any new situation or sudden or loud situation, but can easly be calmed. This must be worked on and to be expected at this age!

· Will walk into trailer without problems.

· And we already know that you can climb on her back and sit there with no issues and/or lead her around (handler). We have not repeated that.


And, yes, I never loop the rope around my hand as I do not want to be dragged around if she decides to run.

Thank you
Henry

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8 years 1 month ago #31 by iliane
Replied by iliane on topic young horse - What do I do?
Hey Henry, sorry it has taken me so long to get back with you!

I'm sure the horse has great potential and I'm glad to hear that you are not intending to let your grandkids ride her for the time being.

We strongly suggest for you to find somebody down the road that can help you with her. The places we are familiar with in our area are Woodland Equestrian Center woodlandsequestrianclub.com/ and Harras Dos Cavaleiros www.harasdoscavaleiros.com/ . There must also be a lot of western places but we are not familiar with it.

Also consider coming to us for a horsemanship course where we can help you anticipate certain situation before they arise. As we mentioned in Houston we are right at 2 hours from Tomball. It sounds as if you are basically right where you should be to get started on the DVD we are sending you. It deals a lot with lunging and the very basic riding exercises. I would suggest to lunge her 6-10 weeks before you consider backing her. The lunging will bond her to you and will get her more in a working mood. If you have a round pen lunge her there and then have a professional start to rider her there. If you don't have a round pen find a small area where she can't get away too easy. I would not do this in an unfenced area as if she were to spook and run off you might not be able to stop her before she gets to a road.
And remember (like you said in your email) to never ever ever wrap a lung line around your arm and be careful not to step into the loop of the lung line. It is a really good idea for you to go take some lunging lessons (as in them showing you how to lunge rather than them lunging you on a horses) at Woodland or Harras.
To be on the safe side I would not consider starting a trot on the lunge line until YOU are so coordinated that you dont ever wrap the lunge line ( sounds easier than it is) dont ever have to drop the whip when you change directions (trick is to pin whip under your arm pointing to the back when you need two hands for whatever reason) never drop the whip on the ground. If you drop the whip that means at some point you need to pick it up. When you pick it up your head goes toward the ground when you pick it up with is right at the perfect height to get kicked in the head if she were to spook or simply stomp for a flight. The lunge line should also never drag on the ground. When you are able to lunge her for 15 minutes with those 3 things (no dropping of whip, no wrapping of lunge line, no dragging of lunge line in sand) you are probably ready to pick up a little trot. Follow the count down exercises in the video for starting to trot her. You might get your grandkids super fit this way. Best way to ensure it is stressfree for her especially because at this point it is a bit of the blind leading the blind, is to always have somebody walk on her OUTSIDE while lunging. the outside is important because that allows her to still see you the lunger.
When she seems to have figured out what you want have the sidewalker stop for one round and see if she keeps going around in the circle for just one round. If she does praise her and have the sidewalker help for a round and then again stop. That way you can slowly wean her from the dependence on the side walker. If she turns or stops, don't get mad at her (at this point it would be difficult for you to know if she is simply resisting or just misunderstanding) and instead just have the sidewalker bring her back on track and start over again.

Details on how to use the equipment etc are all in the DVD. Just wanted to give you a bit more details as the DVD is assuming a horse that is not quite as young and inexperienced and is made for people that have been around horses for a while.

When you are done with the lunging (6-10 weeks) I suggest for you to get a professional to help you out! Probably best to get the professional before. But what you don't want is for her to spook and the inexperienced rider up there to get scared and scare her and for the rider to fall off and you also don't want to teach her that she can easily get rid of the rider by just doing a tiny hope to the side or so. It is much more difficult to fix bad habits than to start them right!!!!
We do have a program here : horseboyworld.com/programs/horse-trainin...aration-program.html it is not exactly written for your situation though. It's intended for
riders that have safe but not well educated horses. It will help to get your basic trail horse to the next level and help them become closer to a refined Horse Boy Backriding horse.

Hope this helps and looking forward to hear about your progress.

~ Iliane
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8 years 1 month ago #32 by iliane
Replied by iliane on topic young horse - What do I do?
Find the preparing the backriding horses DVD here: www.horseboyworld.com/shop/dvds/horse-bo...=2725115&id=11875683

~ Iliane
**********************************
LIVE FREE *** RIDE FREE

Instagram: @horseboyworld
HB: horseboyworld.com/jomsocial/iliane/profile.html
FB: www.facebook.com/iliane

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